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How to resolve incorrect time with Windows Domain Controller

The Domain Controller should be the definitive source for time for the entire Windows Domain network. It needs to sync directly to NTP servers and not the hardware clock of the machine it's on whether it's a virtual machine or a physical server.

That means don't set VMware Tools to sync time for the guest. There are several frustating limitations to the VMware tools time sync that make it the wrong tool for the job. VMWare defaults to having time sync disabled on Windows Server guests for a good reason.

That does mean that you'll need to set your Domain Controller to get it's time synchronization directly from the Internet (or a definitive clock source).

Run the following from an escalated command line.

C:\net stop w32time
C:\> w32tm /config /syncfromflags:manual /manualpeerlist:”0.pool.ntp.org, 1.pool.ntp.org, 2.pool.ntp.org”

If the above command does not work, try this …

w32tm /config /update /manualpeerlist:"0.pool.ntp.org,0x8 1.pool.ntp.org,0x8 2.pool.ntp.org,0x8 3.pool.ntp.org,0x8" /syncfromflags:MANUAL
<code>C:\>w32tm /config /reliable:yes
C:\>net start w32time
C:\>w32tm /query /configuration

Those commands will set the appropriate registry keys so that your server will get the time directly from the Internet and not the hardware clock or VMware tools. Once you've gotten the DC time correct (including your timezone), then the other machines will update automatically over time. You can force an update using …

C:\>w32tm /resync

The command prompts the local computer to sync to it's configured time source. If it's a Domain Member, then it will sync to the previously configured and updated Domain Controller(s).

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